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  • 20 Sep 2017
    GAROL NASAARA ( THE COMING OF THE WHITE MAN)   (1 . "Garol Nasaara" - "The Coming of the White Man." The word Nasaara here refers to Europeans, as opposed to its original usage in the Holy Qur'an referring to Christians. The poem is part of a larger work composed by Malam Hamaseyo Girei, a popular poet in Adamawa State of Nigeria. He probably wrote the poem in the 1920s, and it consists of twenty-four dual- stanza lines or verses. The theme of the poem seeks to convey the historical facts of how the British came to Yola in September 1901 and used force to take control of the emirate.) 1.1 Garki Nasaara laatake dow fomnde, 1.2 Ngoo Biniwoy ngo roondi ɓurɗum ɓolde.      The coming of the White Man was by the river,         This very Benue River carried sophisticated ammunition. 2.1 Naafi kiʾen hoɓɓe ɓe ɗaɓɓay beero, 2.2 To fomnde mayo ton ɓe weeri naa wuro.         The visitors 2 who were hypocrites did not look for a host,        It was at the riverside that they resided, not in town. 3.1 Werde nde maɓɓe laati laana maɓɓe, 3.2 Ton ɓe hoɗii e balmi kaɓɓe kaɓɓe.       Their hosting place was their ship,        They resided there with heaps of ammunition. 4.1 Ballo Mo maɓɓe teema Hamman Peeto, 4.2 Ga Lekki ɓokki jammoraa Hampeeto.        Their aid3 might be one called Hampeeto,         Because the Baobab Tree4 was nicknamed Hampeeto. 5.1 Ɓokki ki Hampeeto fu seedi garki, 5.2 Nganam to ɓakki maaki laanawal faki.            Even the Baobab Tree of Hampeeto5 witnessed the coming,            Because it was near it that the ship got anchored. 6.1 Ki eewi ɓaade laamu maati diggi, 6.2 Ɗi bundugaaru tawma yonki eggi.         It could scan the royal house6 confused with chaos,           That of a gun, hoping that those around escaped. 7.1 Kaawu mo am wiʾii ɓe tamma darngal, 7.2 Nyannde nde’e ɓe ngi ko ɓarti ɓargal.         My maternal uncle said they thought it was a doomsday,        That very day they saw something more than Power. 7 8.1 Anndi Zubairu Kam to heedi saa’ i nden, 8.2 Ɓe ndulli toy O heedi fuuna nyannde nden.       Oh! Whereabout of Zubairu8 [the emir] at that time,      His whereabouts was a mystery on that day. 9.1 Biiɗo ma yii mo fu o ɓaddinaama, 9.2 He fewre sei o hun o hunniraama.        Anyone who told you that he had seen him, 9         what he said was, Near to telling a lie, unless he swore and made to swear. 3 10.1 Deftere Allah mawnde teddinaande, 10.2 Nden bo ni wattam ‘yamɗ e heewan kaade.        By the holy book of Allah,         And even so, he would be subjected to tough interrogation.10 11.1 Lamɗ o Zubairu calɗ o keefaraaku, 11.2 O majjiti o dilli marɗ o risku.          Lamiɗ o [Emir] Zubairu could not be a party to unbelief,           He vanished and left honorably. 12.1 Woɓɓ e mbi’  i o jooɗ a ɗ um laruura, 12.2 O wii ɓ e defte Allah ɓ ur basiira.           Some said he should stay due to necessity,11            He said to them that holy books spoke with clarity. 13.1 O ɓ esdoyaayi ɗ on o haaɗ i kul ma. 13.2 Woɓɓ e ni ɓ esdanii mo marɓ e himma.           He did not add anything to what he said, but,            Some who knew what he meant12 extended. 14.1 Annduɓ e Kaɓɓ e deftere nde Allah, 14.2 Ɓ e tokkini hadiise Bajjo Allah.        Those who knew where to quote from Allah’s book,          And also followed by narrating the traditions of Allah’s        Prophet. 15.1 Omoto le ngol Awfu ngi’aa aayaaje, 15.2 Tatiije tokkindirɗ e fahmu haaje.      Open Chapter 5 of Awf and refer to verses,13       The three verses, near one another, and understand your needs. 16.1 Ɓ e’en ɓ e hiitoraaki ɗ um ko jibbina, 16.2 Wi’aama kamɓ e ɓ en ɓ e kaafi  ruuna.        Those who fail to abide by what has been revealed,14          It is said that they are [the same as] unbelievers 17.1 Ɓe’en ɓe hiitoraaki ɗum ko jibbina, 17.2 Wi’aama kamɓe ɓen ɓe zaalimuuna.         Those who fail to abide by what has been revealed,           It is said that they are [the same as] wrongdoers. 18.1 Ɓe’en ɓe hiitoraaki ɗum ko jibbina, 18.2 Wi’aama kamɓe ɓen ɓe faasiƙuuna.           Those who fail to abide by what has been revealed,  It is said that                 they         are [the same as] hypocrites. 19.1 Allah Ceniiɗo ngecci’en nder aaya, 19.2 Walaa Ko yelditen calen ɗum daaya.       Allah, the exalted told us in the verses [of Qurʾan],           So we have no reason [whatsoever] to refuse,           lest it be out of control. 20.1 Zubairu sappi sappoyaaki Boobo, 20.2 No laati fu Nasaara Sufti Bobbo.      Whether Lamido Zubairu       showed a sign that Bobbo should take over or not, Bobbo  was the choice          of the White Man. 21.1 Ko ɓawtini ɓaawo ɓe wayli laamu, 21.2 Koo ɗume sei biiɗe Nasaara fahmu.          From there on, the leadership changed, Everything became what the              White Man said. 22.1 Ba ɗum waɗaa nanmi e gelle goɗɗe, 22.2 Ko famtinaami haa e mawɗe goɗɗe.           Something of this nature happened elsewhere in other towns too,   I             was made to understand, that even the bigger cities experienced it. 23.1 Sokkoto anndu berniwol ngol Sheehu, 23.2 Gwandu yo martaba Kano e caahu.         As you are aware, Sokoto was the seat of sheikh, Gwandu was righteous         one and Kano was generous. 24.1 Ɗe’ee fu yiidoyii e camngal sheeɗan, 24.2 Ko lutti banda moltoyaaki sheeɗan.        All these [cities] were not free from the devilish act, 15       from (Muslim Responses to British Colonialism in Northern Nigeria as Expressed in FulfuldePoems Author(s): Mallam M. Bashir Abubakar Source: Islamic Africa, Vol. 4, No. 1 (SPRING 2013), pp. 1-14 Published by: Brill Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42636210 Accessed: 18-06-2016 03:13 UTC)
    173 Posted by Mahammad A. Tafida
  • GAROL NASAARA ( THE COMING OF THE WHITE MAN)   (1 . "Garol Nasaara" - "The Coming of the White Man." The word Nasaara here refers to Europeans, as opposed to its original usage in the Holy Qur'an referring to Christians. The poem is part of a larger work composed by Malam Hamaseyo Girei, a popular poet in Adamawa State of Nigeria. He probably wrote the poem in the 1920s, and it consists of twenty-four dual- stanza lines or verses. The theme of the poem seeks to convey the historical facts of how the British came to Yola in September 1901 and used force to take control of the emirate.) 1.1 Garki Nasaara laatake dow fomnde, 1.2 Ngoo Biniwoy ngo roondi ɓurɗum ɓolde.      The coming of the White Man was by the river,         This very Benue River carried sophisticated ammunition. 2.1 Naafi kiʾen hoɓɓe ɓe ɗaɓɓay beero, 2.2 To fomnde mayo ton ɓe weeri naa wuro.         The visitors 2 who were hypocrites did not look for a host,        It was at the riverside that they resided, not in town. 3.1 Werde nde maɓɓe laati laana maɓɓe, 3.2 Ton ɓe hoɗii e balmi kaɓɓe kaɓɓe.       Their hosting place was their ship,        They resided there with heaps of ammunition. 4.1 Ballo Mo maɓɓe teema Hamman Peeto, 4.2 Ga Lekki ɓokki jammoraa Hampeeto.        Their aid3 might be one called Hampeeto,         Because the Baobab Tree4 was nicknamed Hampeeto. 5.1 Ɓokki ki Hampeeto fu seedi garki, 5.2 Nganam to ɓakki maaki laanawal faki.            Even the Baobab Tree of Hampeeto5 witnessed the coming,            Because it was near it that the ship got anchored. 6.1 Ki eewi ɓaade laamu maati diggi, 6.2 Ɗi bundugaaru tawma yonki eggi.         It could scan the royal house6 confused with chaos,           That of a gun, hoping that those around escaped. 7.1 Kaawu mo am wiʾii ɓe tamma darngal, 7.2 Nyannde nde’e ɓe ngi ko ɓarti ɓargal.         My maternal uncle said they thought it was a doomsday,        That very day they saw something more than Power. 7 8.1 Anndi Zubairu Kam to heedi saa’ i nden, 8.2 Ɓe ndulli toy O heedi fuuna nyannde nden.       Oh! Whereabout of Zubairu8 [the emir] at that time,      His whereabouts was a mystery on that day. 9.1 Biiɗo ma yii mo fu o ɓaddinaama, 9.2 He fewre sei o hun o hunniraama.        Anyone who told you that he had seen him, 9         what he said was, Near to telling a lie, unless he swore and made to swear. 3 10.1 Deftere Allah mawnde teddinaande, 10.2 Nden bo ni wattam ‘yamɗ e heewan kaade.        By the holy book of Allah,         And even so, he would be subjected to tough interrogation.10 11.1 Lamɗ o Zubairu calɗ o keefaraaku, 11.2 O majjiti o dilli marɗ o risku.          Lamiɗ o [Emir] Zubairu could not be a party to unbelief,           He vanished and left honorably. 12.1 Woɓɓ e mbi’  i o jooɗ a ɗ um laruura, 12.2 O wii ɓ e defte Allah ɓ ur basiira.           Some said he should stay due to necessity,11            He said to them that holy books spoke with clarity. 13.1 O ɓ esdoyaayi ɗ on o haaɗ i kul ma. 13.2 Woɓɓ e ni ɓ esdanii mo marɓ e himma.           He did not add anything to what he said, but,            Some who knew what he meant12 extended. 14.1 Annduɓ e Kaɓɓ e deftere nde Allah, 14.2 Ɓ e tokkini hadiise Bajjo Allah.        Those who knew where to quote from Allah’s book,          And also followed by narrating the traditions of Allah’s        Prophet. 15.1 Omoto le ngol Awfu ngi’aa aayaaje, 15.2 Tatiije tokkindirɗ e fahmu haaje.      Open Chapter 5 of Awf and refer to verses,13       The three verses, near one another, and understand your needs. 16.1 Ɓ e’en ɓ e hiitoraaki ɗ um ko jibbina, 16.2 Wi’aama kamɓ e ɓ en ɓ e kaafi  ruuna.        Those who fail to abide by what has been revealed,14          It is said that they are [the same as] unbelievers 17.1 Ɓe’en ɓe hiitoraaki ɗum ko jibbina, 17.2 Wi’aama kamɓe ɓen ɓe zaalimuuna.         Those who fail to abide by what has been revealed,           It is said that they are [the same as] wrongdoers. 18.1 Ɓe’en ɓe hiitoraaki ɗum ko jibbina, 18.2 Wi’aama kamɓe ɓen ɓe faasiƙuuna.           Those who fail to abide by what has been revealed,  It is said that                 they         are [the same as] hypocrites. 19.1 Allah Ceniiɗo ngecci’en nder aaya, 19.2 Walaa Ko yelditen calen ɗum daaya.       Allah, the exalted told us in the verses [of Qurʾan],           So we have no reason [whatsoever] to refuse,           lest it be out of control. 20.1 Zubairu sappi sappoyaaki Boobo, 20.2 No laati fu Nasaara Sufti Bobbo.      Whether Lamido Zubairu       showed a sign that Bobbo should take over or not, Bobbo  was the choice          of the White Man. 21.1 Ko ɓawtini ɓaawo ɓe wayli laamu, 21.2 Koo ɗume sei biiɗe Nasaara fahmu.          From there on, the leadership changed, Everything became what the              White Man said. 22.1 Ba ɗum waɗaa nanmi e gelle goɗɗe, 22.2 Ko famtinaami haa e mawɗe goɗɗe.           Something of this nature happened elsewhere in other towns too,   I             was made to understand, that even the bigger cities experienced it. 23.1 Sokkoto anndu berniwol ngol Sheehu, 23.2 Gwandu yo martaba Kano e caahu.         As you are aware, Sokoto was the seat of sheikh, Gwandu was righteous         one and Kano was generous. 24.1 Ɗe’ee fu yiidoyii e camngal sheeɗan, 24.2 Ko lutti banda moltoyaaki sheeɗan.        All these [cities] were not free from the devilish act, 15       from (Muslim Responses to British Colonialism in Northern Nigeria as Expressed in FulfuldePoems Author(s): Mallam M. Bashir Abubakar Source: Islamic Africa, Vol. 4, No. 1 (SPRING 2013), pp. 1-14 Published by: Brill Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42636210 Accessed: 18-06-2016 03:13 UTC)
    Sep 20, 2017 173
  • 27 Aug 2016
      I found this document online about fulfulde ajami  i had to share it this is topic i enjoy reading about. Alphabet and Orthography StatementFor Fulfulde [FUB] Ajamiya(Found in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Central African Republic)By Scott Clark, MASILB.P. 1299Yaoundé, Cameroon2007   Alphabet and Orthography Statement For Fulfulde [FUB] AjamiyaBy Scott Clark, M.A.Language: Fulfulde [Ethnologue code: FUB](Spoken in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Central African Republic)Introduction:The alphabet described in this document is the result of many years of research, which began in the early 1960’s by Dr. Kristian Skulberg of Norway (in Ngaoundéré, Cameroon). Ron Nelson and the Sawtu Linjiila staff (a Fulfulde media and radio organization) continued his work in the 1980’s. By 1990, the orthography was well established. The orthography in the present statement has not significantly changed since that time. In 1998, at the JCMWA/MICCAO conference in Ngaoundéré, Cameroon; over 100 representatives from 14 West African countries agreed that this orthography would be a good standard for writing the Fulfulde language with Arabic script (called Ajamiya).One of the first Roman script orthographies for Fulfulde was developed by F.W. Taylor in the 1930’s (see his dictionary, 1932). In 1966, a unified Roman script orthography was recommended by UNESCO at the ‘Meeting of Experts for the Unification of Alphabets of the National Languages’ held atBamako, Mali. The orthography proposed in this paper is based on the phonology statement forAdamawa Fulfulde [FUB] found in Stennis, 1967.In 2002 a computer program was developed by Mark Rogalski and myself to “transliterate” the Roman script Fulfulde into Ajamiya script Fulfulde. It is still not 100% accurate and needs to be proofread for mistakes. The following Alphabet and Orthography Statement is presented in order to make the most accurate transliteration possible while maintaining as much as possible indigenous  Ajamiya conventions of the [FUB] Fulfulde dialect (abbreviations are on page 18).The Consonants:(The vowels will be introduced on page 14)Arabic alphabetical order (Abjadi) is adopted here showing the Ajamiya grapheme, Fulfulde name andphoneme1: أ -aliifi [a:] ب,bee [a], ت -tee [t]  ث, camamlu [],  ج ,jiimi [dz]  ح  -haa baaluul [h], خha to'b'bungol,د -deeli [c], - ذ zaali [] ر ,arre [], ز -zayra [y], س -siini [s], ش -ciini [s]or[]or[ts],  ص- saadi [s], -  ض baadi [d],  ظ zaadi [], ع –ayni kebuwal [],غangani kebuwal , ف fee [fe],  ق -gaafu [],  ك -keefu [k], ل- laamu [l],  م-miimi [m],  ن-nuunu][n],- ھhakabeere [h],  و-waawu [w],  ي-yah [j],  ء-hamaza [] -- ِIn addition, five Non-Arabic phonemes are found in Fulfulde; the symbols chosen to represent these sounds are: بء bee mod'u,يءyah mod'u,ف.pee,نغ nunu e angani. These  five characters are still under discussion. However, they have been used with good understanding for the lasttwenty years in Cameroon, with the exception of the p. The p has been recently adopted after a thoroughsearch of the contemporary use of Ajamiya in Northern Cameroon (see Orthography Report of SpecialLetters, March 2006 by myself). Several Arabic sounds and their corresponding consonants are NOT used in1See Appendix 1 for the chart of these letters in Abajada order (Warsh Qur’anic tradition). See Appendix 2 for the SummaryChart that is in Arabic Alphabetic order (Abjadi order). MORE information
    1662 Posted by Mahammad A. Tafida
  •   I found this document online about fulfulde ajami  i had to share it this is topic i enjoy reading about. Alphabet and Orthography StatementFor Fulfulde [FUB] Ajamiya(Found in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Central African Republic)By Scott Clark, MASILB.P. 1299Yaoundé, Cameroon2007   Alphabet and Orthography Statement For Fulfulde [FUB] AjamiyaBy Scott Clark, M.A.Language: Fulfulde [Ethnologue code: FUB](Spoken in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Central African Republic)Introduction:The alphabet described in this document is the result of many years of research, which began in the early 1960’s by Dr. Kristian Skulberg of Norway (in Ngaoundéré, Cameroon). Ron Nelson and the Sawtu Linjiila staff (a Fulfulde media and radio organization) continued his work in the 1980’s. By 1990, the orthography was well established. The orthography in the present statement has not significantly changed since that time. In 1998, at the JCMWA/MICCAO conference in Ngaoundéré, Cameroon; over 100 representatives from 14 West African countries agreed that this orthography would be a good standard for writing the Fulfulde language with Arabic script (called Ajamiya).One of the first Roman script orthographies for Fulfulde was developed by F.W. Taylor in the 1930’s (see his dictionary, 1932). In 1966, a unified Roman script orthography was recommended by UNESCO at the ‘Meeting of Experts for the Unification of Alphabets of the National Languages’ held atBamako, Mali. The orthography proposed in this paper is based on the phonology statement forAdamawa Fulfulde [FUB] found in Stennis, 1967.In 2002 a computer program was developed by Mark Rogalski and myself to “transliterate” the Roman script Fulfulde into Ajamiya script Fulfulde. It is still not 100% accurate and needs to be proofread for mistakes. The following Alphabet and Orthography Statement is presented in order to make the most accurate transliteration possible while maintaining as much as possible indigenous  Ajamiya conventions of the [FUB] Fulfulde dialect (abbreviations are on page 18).The Consonants:(The vowels will be introduced on page 14)Arabic alphabetical order (Abjadi) is adopted here showing the Ajamiya grapheme, Fulfulde name andphoneme1: أ -aliifi [a:] ب,bee [a], ت -tee [t]  ث, camamlu [],  ج ,jiimi [dz]  ح  -haa baaluul [h], خha to'b'bungol,د -deeli [c], - ذ zaali [] ر ,arre [], ز -zayra [y], س -siini [s], ش -ciini [s]or[]or[ts],  ص- saadi [s], -  ض baadi [d],  ظ zaadi [], ع –ayni kebuwal [],غangani kebuwal , ف fee [fe],  ق -gaafu [],  ك -keefu [k], ل- laamu [l],  م-miimi [m],  ن-nuunu][n],- ھhakabeere [h],  و-waawu [w],  ي-yah [j],  ء-hamaza [] -- ِIn addition, five Non-Arabic phonemes are found in Fulfulde; the symbols chosen to represent these sounds are: بء bee mod'u,يءyah mod'u,ف.pee,نغ nunu e angani. These  five characters are still under discussion. However, they have been used with good understanding for the lasttwenty years in Cameroon, with the exception of the p. The p has been recently adopted after a thoroughsearch of the contemporary use of Ajamiya in Northern Cameroon (see Orthography Report of SpecialLetters, March 2006 by myself). Several Arabic sounds and their corresponding consonants are NOT used in1See Appendix 1 for the chart of these letters in Abajada order (Warsh Qur’anic tradition). See Appendix 2 for the SummaryChart that is in Arabic Alphabetic order (Abjadi order). MORE information
    Aug 27, 2016 1662